Latest Posts

Biography

  • Imam Abu Hanifa رحمة الله عليه
N
u’man ibn Thabit was born in the city of Kufa in the year 80 A.H. (699 A.D.) (according to another narration 70 A.H.). He is better known by his appellation, Imam al-Adham (The Greatest Imam), or his byname Abu Hanifah. He is known to be one of the greatest minds the Islamic world has ever known. One of the 4 canonical schools of Islamic law, the Hanifah madhab, bears his name. The Imam lived in the time of the Successors of the Companions of the Messenger of Allah. He saw several of the companions such as, Anas ibn Malik, Abdullah ibn Afwa and Sahl ibn Sa’ad, this made him in the ranks of the Successors.
Imam Abu Hanifah’s father, Thabit, was a successful merchant.The young Nu’man, was following along in his father’s footsteps. He had a very sharp and penetrating intellect … read more
  • Imam Malik ibn Anas رحمة الله عليه
I
mam Malik was born in 93 A.H.in the city of Madinah. His family was originally from Yemen, but his grandfather had moved to Madinah during the reign of Umar ibn al-Khattab. Both his father and grandfather had studied religious sciences under the Companions of the Prophet who still lived in Madinah, and thus young Malik was raised in an environment that was based on Islamic scholarship, learning from his father and uncle.After an immense amount of study that extended into his 20s and 30s, Imam Malik became known as the most learned man in Madinah at his time.He became a teacher, attracting a huge number of students to lectures, which he held in the mosque of the Prophet صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم. Students flocked to his lectures from all corners of the Muslim world. Among his more notable students were Abu Yusuf, Muhammad al-Shaybani, and Imam al-Shafi’i.
The most unique aspect of Imam Malik’s methodology in fiqh was his reliance on the practices of the people of Madinah as a source of law.In the study of fiqh, there are numerous sources that are used to derive laws … read more
  • Imam al-Shafi`i رحمة الله عليه
H
is full name is, Muhammad ibn Idris ibn al-`Abbas, better known as Imam al-Shafi`i. He was born in Gaza, in 150 A.H., the year of Imam Abu Hanifa’s death, and moved to Mecca at the age of two, following his father’s death, where he grew up. He was early a skillful archer, then he took to learning language and poetry until he gave himself to fiqh, beginning with hadith. He memorized the Qur’an at age seven, then Malik’s Muwatta’ by the age of thirteen. Al-Nawawi listed three peculiar merits of al-Shafi`i: his sharing the Prophet’s lineage at the level of their common ancestor `Abd Manaf;his birth in the Holy Land of Palestine and upbringing in Mecca; and his education at the hands of superlative scholars together with his own superlative intelligence and knowledge of the Arabic language.
Imam Malik ibn Anas and Imama Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Shaybani were among his most prominent teachers. Al-Shafi`i said: “From Muhammad ibn al-Hasan I wrote a camel-load.” … read more
  • Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal رحمة الله عليه
H
is name is Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Hanbal. He was born in 164 A.H. in Baghdad. His father was a soldier and died at a young age. Imam Ahmad grew up in an environment of learning and was a student of knowledge from a young age.He was chiefly interested in acquiring knowledge of hadith and traveled extensively through Iraq, Syria, Arabia and other places in the Middle East studying religion and collecting the hadith of the Prophet Muhammad, sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam. His travels occupied several years of his early life.
He is one the most famous students of Imam al-Shafi’i.And the Imam said of his student, ‘I left Baghdad and did not leave behind me anyone more virtuous, more learned, more knowledgeable than Ahmad ibn Hanbal.’”Here are some other statements of his contemporaries about him … read more
  • Imam Abu Yusuf رحمة الله عليه
H
e is Ya’qub Ibn Ibrahim Al Anshari. He was born on year 113 A.H. Abu Yusuf started to study sciences since he was a small boy under the tutelage of Ibn Abi Layla, then he moved to learn sciences from Abu Hanifah.He learned sciences from Imam Abu Hanifah for a very long time. Abu Yusuf said,
“I learned sciences from Abu Hanifah for seventeen years. I never absent from his lesson, whether it was Eid al Fitr or eid al Adha, unless I was sick.”
Among his teachers were Abu Hanifah, Ibn Abi Layla, Al-A’masy, Ibn Ishaq, Ats-Tsauri, and many other scholars. He had senior students, among them was Muhammad Ibn Hasan Asy Syaibani. He was once an appointed judge for several periods of caliphate of Bani Abbasiya. He was the first one to be dubbed as ““Qadhi Qudhat” (Judge of the judges).Abu Yusuf was known as prominent Islamic figure who had expertise in jurisprudence, Qur’an interpretation, etc. Hilal Ibn Yahya said, “Abu Yusuf memorized the tafseer, history of battles, history of Arabs, and he was an expert of jurisprudence. Beside that, he was also considered as an expert of hadith.” Yahya Ibn Ma’in said, “I’ve never seen any of the logicians who was stronger and more valid in the field of hadith than the narration of Abu Yusuf.”He died on year 182 H. He had several writings, and the famous among those writings was the book “Al Kharaj”.
  • Imam ibn Abidin Shami رحمة الله عليه
M
uhammad Amin Ibn Abidin ash-shami (1198–1252 AH / 1784–1836 AD) also known as Allama ash-shami was a prominent Islamic scholar and Jurist who lived in the city of Damascus in Syria during the Ottoman era. He was the authority of the fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) of the Hanafi madhhab (school of law). He was entitled as Amin al-fatwa, which meant that he was the mufti that people would go to when they had legal questions in Syria. He composed over 50 works consisting of a major fatwa (legal statement) collection, many treatises, poems, and several commentaries on the works of others. His most famous work was the Radd al-Muhtar ala Ad-Durr al-Mukhtar.
This is still considered the authoritative text of Hanafi fiqh today. Imam Ibn Abidin was born in Damascus in 1784. His family came from a long line of scholars and was, therefore, well respected. He studied the Qur’an starting at a very young age and received his first general degree of authorization when he was about 12 years old. He was said to have memorized the Qur’an before he reached maturity. He was a very determined student. After reciting the Qur’an at his father’s shop and receiving criticism for it, he sought to perfect his work and studied vigorously under several well-known scholars specially Shaykh Saeed Al-Hamawi. After much hard work, he received … read more
  • Imam Quduri رحمة الله عليه
S
haykh Abul-Husayn Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Ja’far ibn Hamdan al-Quduri al-Baghdadi, was born in Baghdad in 362 AH/ 973 CE. He is generally referred to as al_quduri, an ascription derived either from the selling of pots, or to his hometown, called Qudurah. Upon his death, he was buried in his own house, but was later buried next to the grave of the Hanafi jurist, Abu Bakr al-Khwarizmi. Imam Al-Quduri was in the fifth of seven grades of distinguished jurists in the Hanafi madhhab, which is known as the ashab at-tarjih, indicating his authority amongst legal scholars and jurists. His academic prominence and proficiency in legal matters established him as the supreme representative of Hanafi scholarship and law in Iraq. In terms of Hadith narration, he has been referred to as one who is truthful by many prominent scholars.
He authored several books including:
At-tajreed, in seven vloumes, discussing the issues of contention between Hanafi and Shafaee scholars.
Kitab at-Taqreeb: compilation of issues with their evidences.
Sharh Mukhtasar al-Karkhi: commentry on the compendium by Imam al-Karkhi.
Sharh-Adab al-Qadi: commentry on the book on the Islamic legal system, by Imam Ahmad Abu Bakr al-Khassaf.
Mukhtasar-al-Quduri: the compendium of fiqh based on Hanafi principles of jurisprudence and legal methodology, also known as al-Kitab, which bears him name.
He died on Sunday, 5th Rajab, 428 AH/ 1037 CE aged 66.
  • Imam Qadi Khan رحمة الله عليه
I
mam Fakhruddin Hasan Bin Mansoor al-Uzjandi al-Farghani, commonly known as Qazee Khan, was a Hanafi Jurist & Scholar. He was compiler of a large number of essential juristic works and commentaries of Hanafi Fiqh. He belonged to Uzjand a town in suburb of Asfahan near Farghana. He learned from Imam Zahiruddin Al-Hasan Bin Ali Al-Marghinani, and Imam Burhanuddin Al-Kabeer.
Imam Qasim bin Qatloobagha writes in Tasheeh-Al-Qudoori:
“What verified by Qadi Khan is preferred upon what verified by any one else because he is Faqeeh-al-Nafs” (Jurist in Nature).
His work The Fatawa-Qazee Khan is one of the best collection of fatawas of the Hanafi School of thought. It consists of four volumes generally printed in two volumes, containing all chapters of Islamic Jurisprudence. This work is mostly based on Fatawa, which has been a big source of making juristic decisions among the great jurists of all periods. Rather at the time of difference of opinion among jurist regarding any issue Fatawa Qadee Khan plays a big role in drawing final position.
Hardly any Dar-al-Ifta had been or will be without this book. Though this book is known as book of Fatawa as it is apparent by its name, but this books is regarded as bearing higher status according to Fuqaha like Shurooh (commentary of Hanafi Mad’hab).
Imam Qazee Khan passed away in 15th night of Ramadan, 592 AH.
  • Imam Burhanuddin Marghinani رحمة الله عليه
I
mam Burhan al-Din Al-Farghani Al-Marghinani was a great Islamic scholar of the Hanafi school. He was born at Marghinan in the vicinity of Farghana on Monday 8th Rajab in 511/1135 in Marghinan (in Present Day Uzbekistan) His full name was Burhan al-Din Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Abi Bakr ibn Abd al-jalil ibn al-Khalil ibn Abi Bakr al-farghani al-Rushdani al-Marghanini. He is described as the Shayk al-Islam, Imam, Hafidh, Muhaddith,and the leading jurist of his time, the master and possessor of different sciences. His book “Hidaya” became the most famous book in Hanafi Madhab such as he is known as Sahib-e-Hidaya. Al-Dhahabi in Tadhkirat al Huffaz mentioned him as the one filled with knowledge. There was no one like him in his times.
Al-Marghinani was a prolific writer and wrote numerous books. Some of them are
1. Bidayatul Mubtadi : The work is chosen from Jami’ al-Saghir and al-Quduri.
2. Kifayatul Muntaha : long commentary on Bidayatul Mubtadi in 80 volumes.
3. Kitab al-Muntaqa
4. Kitab at-Tajniis Wa al-Mazid
5. Kitab al-Manasik al Hajj
6. Nashrul Madhahib
7. Mukhtarat an-Nawazil
8. Faraid al-‘Uthmani
read more
  • Mulla Ali Qari رحمة الله عليه
I
mam Ali who is well known as Mulla Ali Al-Qari is one of the great Hanafi masters of hadith and Imams of fiqh, Qur’anic commentary, language, history and tasawwuf. He authored several great commentaries such as al-Mirqat on Mishkat al-masabih in several volumes, a two-volume commentary on Qadi `Iyad’s al-Shifa’, and a two-volume commentary on Ghazali’s abridgment of the Ihya entitled `Ayn al-`ilm wa zayn al-hilm (The spring of knowledge and the adornment of understanding). His book of prophetic invocations, al-Hizb al-a`zam (The supreme daily dhikr) forms the basis of Imam al-Jazuli’s celebrated manual of dhikr, Dala’il al-khayrat, which along with the Qur’an is recited daily by many pious Muslims around the world.
He writes in the foreword to his commentary on Ghazali: I wrote this commentary on the abridgment of Ihya’ `ulum al-din by the Proof of Islam and the Confirmation of Creatures hoping to receive some of the outpouring of blessings from the words of the most pure knowers of Allah, and to benefit from the gifts that exude from the pages of the Shaykhs and the Saints, so that I may be mentioned in their number and be raised in their throng, even if I fell short in their following and their service, for I rely on my love for them and content myself with my longing for them … read more
  • Imam Hasan Shurunbulali رحمة الله عليه
H
is name is Hasan ibn Ammar Abu-Al-Ikhlas Almisry Al-Wafaee Al-Shurunbulali. He was born in 994 AH/1580 C. He was one of the greatest jurist of his time, regarded as the most brilliant and person of knowledge. He became a master of jurisprodence at the hands of Abdullah al-Nahriri and Muhammad as-Mahdy. Imam Shurunbulali studied in the Azhar in Cairo, also taught there. He belongs to a town known as Shabri Bululah. His father braught him to Cairo when he was 6, so he grew up there in educational atmospehre of Al-Azhar, and became a source of great benefit for others. Other scholars, such as al-Mahby said about him “He was the lamp and luminous shine of al-Azhar”. He learned on Shaikh Abdullah Al-Nahriri, Shaikh Mahby, and Shaikh Ali Ibn Ghanim Al-Muqaddasi. And learned upon him many scholars such as: Allama Ahmad Al-Ajmi, Al-Sayyid Ahmad Al-Hamawi, Allama Ismael Al-Nabulsi and others. The Imam was a possessor of high moral qualities and an eloquence in the Arabic language. He was an individual who abstained from anything which resembled foulness and grasped to the religion of Allah. He authored a number of books for the benefit of the people such as: Sharh Al-Mandhuma Ibn Wahban consisting of two volumes. Nur al-Idah and Najatul Arwah, that is, this book. Tufatul Akmal. Hashia ala Kitab ad-Durar wal-Ghurar. Maraqi Al-Falaah commentry on Nur al_idaah Maraqi-Al-Sa’aadah. He passed away on Friday after Asr during Ramadan 1069 AH at the age of 75 years.
  • Imam Ahmed Raza Khan رحمة الله عليه
I
mam Ahmed Raza Khan was born on Monday, the 10th of Shawaal 1272 A.H. (14th June 1856), in the city of Bareilly India. The name that was given to him at birth was the beautiful name of “Mohammed.” The name corresponding to that year of his birth was “Al Mukhtaar.” His grandfather, also gave the beautiful name of “Ahmed Raza.” It was by this name that he was famously known. Much later in his life, A’la Hadrat added the title “Abdul Mustafa” to his name signifying his great love and respect for Sayyiduna Rasulullah (Peace be upon him).
Imam Ahmed Raza Khan Al-Qaderi, was the son of Allamah Mawlana Naqi Ali Khan, who was the son of Allamah Mawlana Raza Ali Khan. The great forefathers of A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) migrated from Qandhar (Kabul) during the Mogul rule and settled in Lahore. Later on they settled in Bareilly a famous city of north India. A’la Hadrat’s grandfather Allamah Mawlana Raza Ali Khan was born in the year 1224 A.H. He was also a great warrior and fought with General Bakht Khan against English invaders in the year 1834. He passed away in the month of Jamaadi-ul-Awwal in the year 1282 A.H. (1866). A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) was at this time only 10 years old. … read more
  • Allama Amjad Ali Azmi رحمة الله عليه
A
llama Muhammad Amjad Ali Azmi was amongst one of the most prominent and illustrious personalities of India. He was the greatest Jurist of his era in the Indian sub-continent. He is known as Sadrush- Shariah in the sub-continent. He was born in Ghosi, a known town of Azamgarh in India. His father and grandfather both were renowned scholars in Religious theology and expert specialists in Unani medicine. He received his higher education at the Madrassa Hanafiya in Jaunpur. From Allama Hidayatullah Rampuri. After graduating from Jaunpur he travelled to Madrasatul Hadieth Pileebheet, and learnt there Islamic Juresprudence and Hadieth, and achieved his authority of Hadieth from prominent Shaikh of the time Allama Wasi Ahmed Muhaddithe Surati.
After graduating and acquiring his degree, he was immediately engaged as the Principal of Madrassa Ahl-e-Sunnat which was one of the most reputable Madrassas in Patna, Bihar. He then journeyed to Lucknow where he studied ‘Ilm-ut-Tibb’ for two years. After completion of this course, he returned home and commenced serving the people by starting a clinic. His clinic began to progress successfully. When Huzoor Muhadith-e-Surati heard that Sadrush Shariah had started practicing and had opened a clinic for this purpose, he became very sad. At this time, A’la Hazrat Imam Ahmed Raza Khan required the services of a teacher at the Darul-Uloom Manzar-e- Islam. Sadrush Shariah then left his clinic and proceeded to Bareilly. At Bareilly, he first served as a teacher … read more
  • Allama Mustafa Raza Khan رحمة الله عليه
A
llama Mustafa Raza Khan, commonly known among the Muslims of the Indian sub-continent as “Mufti-e-Azam Hind” was born in Bareilly (India) in 1892. His father, Moulana Ahmed Raza Khan (1856 – 1921) and grandfather, Moulana Naqi Ali Khan (d. 1880), were recognised as great scholars of Islam in Islamic academic circles all over the world.
Educational Background: He was born into a scholarly atmosphere. Moulana Mustapha Raza Khan completed his religious education under the guidance of his learned father as well as other great Ulema. He was well versed in more than twenty branches of oriental learning, including Tafseer, Hadith, Fiqh, Sarf, Nahv, Tajweed, Balghat, Tasawwuf, Mantiq, Seerah, Tareekh, Kalam, Aqa’id, Reyazvi, Touqeet, Jafar and Hayat.
He was a Shaikh of the Qadriya order. His own spiritual guide, Shaik Shah Abul Hussain Noori (1839-1906) of Mahrehra Shareef (India) was a great Sufi and spiritual guide. It is estimated that nearly ten million Muslims received spiritual guidance from Huzoor Mufti-e-Azam Hind.He visited Haramain Shareefain three times. During his two pilgrimages in 1905 and 1945, photographs were not introduced for the Haj journey. But on his last visit in 1971, although visa and passport photographs were introduced, he was given special permission to travel to Saudi Arabia without providing his photograph for passport or visa by the governments of India and Saudi Arabia. This event showed the strict adherence of Huzoor Mufti-e-Azam Hind to the Shariah … read more
  • Mufti Muhammad Waqaruddin رحمة الله عليه
H
e was born on 14th of Safarul Muzaffar 1333 Ah/ 15 January 1915 AC in Pilibheet India, he received his education in Fiqh and Hadeith from Sadrush Sharia. He had the honor to take the oath of allegiance (the Bayat) to Hujjatul Islam Hazrat Hamid Raza Kahn, and reiceived Khilafat from Mufti Azam Hind Allama Musrafa Raza Khan. Allama Sardar Ahmad Muhaddithe Azam Pakistan is among his teachers whereas Allama Abdul Mustafa Al-Azhari was among his contemporaries. He is known as Mufti Azam Pakistan.
Mufti Muhammad Waqqaruddin studied from four great Scholars in Manzare Islam Bareily Shareef which include:1. Sadrush e Shariah Maulana Amjad ali aazmi 2. Mohaddis e Aazam Pakistan Maulana Sardar Ahmad QadiriAfter some times, Sadrush e Shariah left Bareily Shareef and headed towards a village in Zilla Ali Garh “Dadoon”. His Eminence Mufti Sahib also left for a while to continue with the further education. For three years they stayed in the company of Huzoor Sadrush e Shariah and completed the religious education and then started a Dowra e Hadees. In the Dowara e hadees other students included were Allama Abdul Mustafa azhari, Maulana Mustafa Ali and Maulana Khaleel … read more
  • Mufti Jalaluddin Amjadi رحمة الله عليه
M
ufti Jalaluddin Ahmad Amjadi is a well-known jurist of the last century in India, and known as Faqeeh-e-Millat.
He was born 1352 AH /1933 AC in Ujha ganj Basti (India)
He studied from Allama Arshadul Qadri
His forefathers were from Rajput family, one of them Murad Singh converted to Islam and named as Murad Ali. His father Jan Muhammad was a pious man, and was appointed as Imam to lead five times prayers and Friday prayer as well without any pay. Mufti Jalaluddin memorized Holy Quran at the age of ten, and received his basic education in his own area, then after India gor freedom from Birtish Empire he journeyed to Nagpur, where he began working (to earn money for supporting his father) in the day time and learning religious education from Allama Arshadul Qadri after sunset till midnight… read more
Imam Abu Hanifah رحمة الله عليه

   

N
u’man ibn Thabit was born in the city of Kufa in the year 80 A.H. (699 A.D.). He is better known by his appellation, Imam al-Adham (The Greatest Imam), or his byname Abu Hanifah.  He is known to be one of the greatest minds the Islamic world has ever known. One of the 4 canonical schools of Islamic law, the Hanifah madhab, bears his name. The Imam lived in the time of the Successors of the Companions of the Messenger of Allah صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم. He saw several of the companions such as, Anas ibn Malik, Abdullah ibn Afwa and Sahl ibn Sa’ad, this made him in the ranks of the Successors.

Imam Abu Hanifah’s father, Thabit, was a successful merchant. The young Nu’man, was following along in his father’s footsteps. He had a very sharp and penetrating intellect. As Kufa was a center of learning he would attend the sessions of learning from time to time, but he primarily concerned himself in the market place. However a chance encounter changed the direction of his life and history. One day while Abu Hanifah was passing the house of Sha’bi (one of the Tabi’in), Sha’bi called him over and asked, “Where are you going young man?”. The Imam mentioned the name of the merchant he wanted to visit. Sha’bi said, “ I mean whose classes do you attend?”. The Imam replied, “Nobody’s”. Shab’i responded, “I see signs of intelligence in you, you should sit in the company of learned men.” From this encounter Imam Abu Hanifah began to dedicate himself to the path of knowledge.

Imam Abu Hanifah sat with and debated many scholars. His most influential teacher was Hammad ibn Sulayman. He stayed under the supervision and instruction of Hammad for 18 years until the death of Hammad. The fiqh of Hammad of Ibrahim an-Nakha’I which in turn ultimately represented the fiqh of Abdullah ibn Mas’ud and Ali ibn Abi Talib.

Despite his devotion to knowledge he still maintained trade with the assistance of a partner. And from his wealth he not only supported himself but other scholars and his students. His knowledge, generosity and piety have become legendary as a few statements from his contemporaries and others will bear out.

His contemporary, al-Fudayl ibn ‘Iyad, a man renowned for scrupulousness, said about him, “Abu Hanifa was a faqih, a man known for f i q h, reasonably wealthy and known for graciousness towards all who visited him. He was steadfast in teaching knowledge both night and day. He had a good reputation and was often silent. He was a man of few words. When a question on the lawful or unlawful would come to him, he was good at pointing out the truth and he was loath to accept the ruler’s money.”

Another contemporary, Malih ibn Waki‘ said about him, “Abu Hanifa was very trustworthy. By Allah, he had a noble heart and preferred the pleasure of his Lord above everything. If swords had been used on him in the Cause of Allah, he would have endured that. May Allah have mercy on him and be pleased with him as He is pleased with the pious.” His contemporary, ‘Abdullah ibn al-Mubarak, described him as ‘the quintessence of knowledge.’

As it has happened throughout time there was conflict between the scholars and the rulers in the time of Imam Abu Hanifah.

In {146 A.H.} 763 A.D. Al-Mansoor – the Khalifa– offered the Imam the post of Chief Qadhi of the state, but Imam Abu Hanifah declined to accept the post and chose to remain independent. In his reply to Al-Mansoor, Imam Abu Hanifah excused himself by saying that he did not regard himself fit for the post offered. Al-Mansoor, who had his own ideas and reasons for offering the post, lost his temper and accused Imam Abu Hanifah of lying.

“If I am lying,” the Imam said, “then my statement is doubly correct. “How can you appoint a liar to the exalted post of a Chief Qadhi?”

Incensed by this reply, Al-Mansoor charged the Imam with contempt, had him arrested and locked in prison.

Even in prison, Imam Abu Hanifah continued to teach those who were permitted to come to him.

It was here in prison that Imam Abu Hanifah was administered a dose of poison in 150 A.H. Realizing that the end was near, the Imam prostrated in prayer and passed away in this condition in the month of Rajab, 150 A.H.

The Hanafi Madhhab spread far and wide during the time of the Ottoman Empire. It almost became the official madhab of the State. Today, more than half of the Muslims all over the world follow this school. 

×
Imam Shafi`i رحمة الله عليه

H
is full name is, Muhammad ibn Idris ibn al-`Abbas, better known as Imam al-Shafi`i.

He was born in Gaza, in 150 A.H., the year of Imam Abu Hanifa’s death, and moved to Mecca at the age of two, following his father’s death, where he grew up. He was early a skillful archer, then he took to learning language and poetry until he gave himself to fiqh, beginning with hadith. He memorized the Qur’an at age seven, then Malik’s Muwatta’ by the age of thirteen.

Al-Nawawi listed three peculiar merits of al-Shafi`i: his sharing the Prophet’s lineage at the level of their common ancestor `Abd Manaf; his birth in the Holy Land of Palestine and upbringing in Mecca; and his education at the hands of superlative scholars together with his own superlative intelligence and knowledge of the Arabic language.

Imam Malik ibn Anas and Imama Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Shaybani were among his most prominent teachers. Al-Shafi`i said: “From Muhammad ibn al-Hasan I wrote a camel-load.” Al-Hakim narrated from `Abd Allah ibn `Abd al-Hakam: “Al-Shafi`i never ceased to speak according to Malik’s position and he would say: ‘We do not differ from him other than in the way of his companions,’ until some young men spoke unbecomingly at length behind his back, whereupon al-Shafi`i resolved to put his differences with Malik in writing. Otherwise, his whole life he would say, whenever asked something: ‘This is what the Teacher said’ – hâdha qawl al-ustadh – meaning Malik.”

As to his intelligence and mastery of the fiqh:

Abu `Ubayd al-Qasim ibn Sallam said: “If the intelligence of an entire nation was brought together he would have encompassed it.”

Al-Sakhawi in the introduction to his al-Jawahir wa al-Durar and others narrate that someone criticized Ahmad ibn Hanbal for attending the fiqh sessions of al-Shafi`i and leaving the hadith sessions of Sufyan ibn `Uyayna. Ahmad replied: “Keep quiet! If you miss a hadith with a shorter chain you can find it elsewhere with a longer chain and it will not harm you. But if you do not have the reasoning of this man [al-Shafi`i], I fear you will never be able to find it elsewhere.”

Al-Shafi`i was known for his peculiar strength in Arabic language, poetry, and philology. Bayhaqi narrated:

[From Ibn Hisham:] I was al-Shafi`i’s sitting-companion for a long time, and I never heard him use except a word which, carefully considered, one would not find (in its context) a better word in the entire Arabic language. . . . Al-Shafi`i’s discourse, in relation to language, is a proof in itself.

Imam Shafi’I wrote over 100 books, the most important of them is Kitab al-Umm.

He died in Cairo, Egypt, on Friday evening after Maghrib, 29th Rajab, 204 A.H. after a short illness, at the age of 53-54 years.

×
Imam Malik رحمة الله عليه

I
mam Malik was born in 93 A.H.in the city of Madinah. His family was originally from Yemen, but his grandfather had moved to Madinah during the reign of Umar ibn al-Khattab. Both his father and grandfather had studied religious sciences under the Companions of the Prophet who still lived in Madinah, and thus young Malik was raised in an environment that was based on Islamic scholarship, learning from his father and uncle.

After an immense amount of study that extended into his 20s and 30s, Imam Malik became known as the most learned man in Madinah at his time. He became a teacher, attracting a huge number of students to lectures, which he held in the mosque of the Prophet صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم. Students flocked to his lectures from all corners of the Muslim world. Among his more notable students were Abu Yusuf, Muhammad al-Shaybani, and Imam al-Shafi’i.

The most unique aspect of Imam Malik’s methodology in fiqh was his reliance on the practices of the people of Madinah as a source of law. In the study of fiqh, there are numerous sources that are used to derive laws. The first and second most important sources are always the Quran and Sunnah. After those two, however, the great scholars of fiqh differed on the next most important source of law. Imam Malik believed that the practices of the people of Madinah should be seen as an important source. His reasoning for this was that Madinah at that time was not far removed from the Madinah of Prophet Muhammad ﷺ. And the people living in the city had been taught Islam by their ancestors who had been Companions of the Prophet صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم or students of the Companions. He thus reasoned that if all of the people of Madinah practiced a particular action and it did not contradict the Quran and Sunnah, then it can be taken as a source of law. He is unique among the four great imams of fiqh in this opinion.

In order to ease the study of fiqh and hadith, Imam Malik compiled a book known as the al-Muwatta. This was the first book that attempted to compile only sound and reliable sayings of Prophet Muhammad صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم into one book. Imam Malik said that he showed his book to seventy scholars in Madinah, who all approved it, thus he gave it the name al-Muwatta, meaning “The Approved”.

Besides being one of the greatest scholars of fiqh, one of the distinguishing qualities of Imam Malik was his incredible respect for the Prophet صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم and his words. He would refuse to narrate a hadith while walking. Instead, when asked about a hadith, he would stop, sit down, and give the hadith the attention it deserved, out of respect for Prophet Muhammad صلی اللہ علیہ وسلم. He would also refuse to ride any animal in the city of Madinah, seeing it as unfathomable that he would ride on the same dust that Muhammad ﷺ’s feet walked on.

Among Imam Malik’s sayings are:

“The Sunnah is the ark of Nuh. Whoever boards it is saved, and whoever remains away perishes.”

“Knowledge does not consist in narrating much. Knowledge is but a light which Allah places in the heart.”

Imam Malik died at the age of 85 in the year 179 A.H.. He was buried in the Baqi Cemetary in Madinah.

×
Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal رحمة الله عليه

H
is name is Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Hanbal. He was born in 164 A.H. in Baghdad. His father was a soldier and died at a young age. Imam Ahmad grew up in an environment of learning and was a student of knowledge from a young age. He was chiefly interested in acquiring knowledge of hadith and traveled extensively through Iraq, Syria, Arabia and other places in the Middle East studying religion and collecting the hadith of the Prophet Muhammad, sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam. His travels occupied several years of his early life.

He is one the most famous students of Imam al-Shafi’i. And the Imam said of his student, ‘I left Baghdad and did not leave behind me anyone more virtuous, more learned, more knowledgeable than Ahmad ibn Hanbal.’”

Here are some other statements of his contemporaries about him.

`Abd Allah ibn Ahmad said: “I heard Abu Zur`a [al-Razi] say: ‘Your father had memorized a million hadiths, which I rehearsed with him according to topic.’”

Ibrahim al-Harbi said: “I held Ahmad as one for whom Allah had gathered up the combined knowledge of the first and the last.”

The biographical notice on Imam Ahmad in the Reliance of the Traveller reads:

“Out of piety, Imam Ahmad never gave a formal legal opinion (fatwa) while Shafi`i was in Iraq, and when he later formulated his school of jurisprudence, he mainly drew on explicit texts from the [Qur’an], hadith, and scholarly consensus, with relatively little expansion from analogical reasoning (qiyâs). He was probably the most learned in the sciences of hadith of the four great Imams of Sacred Law, and his students included many of the foremost scholars of hadith. Abu Dawud said of him: ‘Ahmad’s gatherings were gatherings of the afterlife: nothing of this world was mentioned. Never once did I hear him mention this-worldly things.’ … He never once missed praying in the night, and used to recite the entire [Qur’an] daily. He said, ‘I saw the Lord of Power in my sleep, and said, “O Lord, what is the best act through which those near to You draw nearer?” and He answered, “Through [reciting] (sic) My word, O Ahmad.” I asked, “With understanding, or without?” and He answered, “With understanding and without.”’. . . Ahmad was imprisoned and tortured for twenty-eight months under the Abbasid caliph al-Mu`tasim in an effort to force him to publicly espouse the [Mu`tazila] position that the Holy [Qur’an] was created, but the Imam bore up unflinchingly under the persecution and refused to renounce the belief of Ahl al-Sunna that the [Qur’an] is the uncreated word of Allah, after which Allah delivered and vindicated him. When Ahmad died in 241/855, he was accompanied to his resting place by a funeral procession of eight hundred thousand men and sixty thousand women, marking the departure of the last of the four great mujtahid Imams of Islam.”

Among the works of Imam Ibn Hanbal is the great encyclopedia of ahadith called Al-Musnad, compiled during his life time, completed by his son ‘Abdullah, and amplified by supplements. Al-Musnad contains more than thirty thousand ahadith. His other works include Kitab as-Salah, on the discipline of making salah and Kitab as-Sunnah, on matters of ‘aqidah as they are understood from the hadith of the Prophet, sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam and the sayings and commentaries of the Companions of the Prophet, sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.

×
Imam Abu Yusuf رحمة الله عليه

H
e is Ya’qub Ibn Ibrahim Al Anshari. He was born on year 113 A.H. Abu Yusuf started to study sciences since he was a small boy under the tutelage of Ibn Abi Layla, then he moved to learn sciences from Abu Hanifah.

He learned sciences from Imam Abu Hanifah for a very long time. Abu Yusuf said,

“I learned sciences from Abu Hanifah for seventeen years. I never absent from his lesson, whether it was Eid al Fitr or eid al Adha, unless I was sick.”

Among his teachers were Abu Hanifah, Ibn Abi Layla, Al-A’masy, Ibn Ishaq, Ats-Tsauri, and many other scholars. He had senior students, among them was Muhammad Ibn Hasan Asy Syaibani. He was once an appointed judge for several periods of caliphate of Bani Abbasiya. He was the first one to be dubbed as ““Qadhi Qudhat” (Judge of the judges).

Abu Yusuf was known as prominent Islamic figure who had expertise in jurisprudence, Qur’an interpretation, etc. Hilal Ibn Yahya said, “Abu Yusuf memorized the tafseer, history of battles, history of Arabs, and he was an expert of jurisprudence. Beside that, he was also considered as an expert of hadith.” Yahya Ibn Ma’in said, “I’ve never seen any of the logicians who was stronger and more valid in the field of hadith than the narration of Abu Yusuf.”

He died on year 182 H. He had several writings, and the famous among those writings was the book “Al Kharaj”.

×
Imam Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Shaybani رحمة الله عليه

Imam Muhammad ibn al-Hasan Al Shaybani was one of the two prominent students of Imam Abu Hanifah. The other famous student of Imam Abu Hanifah was Imam Abu Yusuf. He was born in the 131A.H. and passed away in the 189 A.H. Imam Muhammad was also a student of Imam Malik Bin Anas. He studied the hadith with Imam Malik for three years and is a transmitter of the Muwatta. He was a great Shariah scholar and was a teacher to many other prominent scholars such Imam Al- Shafi, Abu Hafs, Al- Bukhari and Al- Kabir. He was known as a master of the Arabic language. Imam Shafi’ said of him, “I have not seen anyone more eloquent than him (i.e. Muhammad bin Al-Hasan Shaybani). I used to think when I saw him reciting the Qur’an that it was as if the Qur’an had been revealed in his language.”

Al-Hafidh Ibn Hajar said in Lisan al-Mizan,

“He is Muhammad ibn al-Hasan ibn Farqad ash-Shaybani, by wala’. He was born in Wasit and grew up in Kufa. He learnt fiqh from Abu Hanifah and hadith from ath-Thawri, Mis’ar, ‘Umar ibn Dharr, Malik ibn Maghul, al-Awza’i, Malik ibn Anas, Rabi’ah ibn Salih and a whole group of people. Those who narrated from him were ash-Shafi’i, Abu Sulayman al-Juzajani, Hisham ar-Razi, ‘Ali ibn Muslim at-Tusi and others. He was appointed qadi in the days of ar-Rashid. Ibn ‘Abd al-Hakam said, ‘I heard ash-Shafi’i saying, ‘Muhammad said, “I stood at Malik’s door for three years and I heard from him more than seven hundred hadith.”‘ Ar-Rabi’ said, ‘I heard ash-Shafi’i saying, “I carried away from Muhammad a camel-load of books.”‘ ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Ali al-Madini said that his father said about Muhammad ibn al-Hasan, ‘An utterly truthful man.'” 

His role in the development of fiqh can be summed up by the statement of Imam Al- Haskafi in his book Ad- Dur Al Mukhtar in which he mentioned that “The discipline of fiqh was cultivated by Abdullah bin Mas’ud (ra), watered by ‘Alqamah, harvested by Ibrahim Al- Nakha’i and collected by Hammad.Then Abu Hanifah transformed it to be flour, Abu Yusuf kneaded it and Muhammad bin Hassan turned it to bread which is then eaten by all of the human beings”.e.”

×
Imam Ameen Ibn Abideen Al-shaami رحمة الله عليه

 

Muhammad Amin Ibn Abidin ash-shami (1198–1252 AH / 1784–1836 AD) also known as Allama ash-shami was a prominent Islamic scholar and Jurist who lived in the city of Damascus in Syria during the Ottoman era. He was the authority of the fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) of the Hanafi madhhab (school of law). He was entitled as Amin al-fatwa, which meant that he was the mufti that people would go to when they had legal questions in Syria. He composed over 50 works consisting of a major fatwa (legal statement) collection, many treatises, poems, and several commentaries on the works of others. His most famous work was the Radd al-Muhtar ala Ad-Durr al-Mukhtar. This is still considered the authoritative text of Hanafi fiqh today.

Imam Ibn Abidin was born in Damascus in 1784. His family came from a long line of scholars and was, therefore, well respected. He studied the Qur’an starting at a very young age and received his first general degree of authorization when he was about 12 years old. He was said to have memorized the Qur’an before he reached maturity. He was a very determined student. After reciting the Qur’an at his father’s shop and receiving criticism for it, he sought to perfect his work and studied vigorously under several well-known scholars specially Shaykh Saeed Al-Hamawi. After much hard work, he received four degrees of authorization from Shaykh Muhammad Shakir Al-Salami Al-Umari. And finally he received his degree of authority in Hadieth from shaykh Muhammad al-Kuzbari al-Kabir,

Ibn Abidin is an excellent example of how the fatwa system worked in reality. Ibn Abidin had a more modernistic view. He also went back and shortened, edited, and added his own opinion to the Damascus mufti before him, Hamid al-Imadi. His more obvious area of flexibility involves his view on urf (local custom). Ibn Abidin’s view on urf was that it was important to include it in fatwas. He claimed that many things change with time and that the laws need to be flexible in order to account for the change in urf. At one point he wrote, “Many of the rules change with the change of time…

This poses a huge problem with keeping fatwas unbiased. Ibn Abidin’s solution to this problem was that Shari’a law was built with the goal of making the life of a believer free from suffering and that if urf was not included in decision making it would result in suffering.

He states that,

“jurists should not proceed by strictly and rigidly adhering to the authoritative books and opinions of the madhhab, but should also pay attention to the needs of the people of his time, or else the harm he does will outweigh the benefit.”

 Another issue which relates to the use of the current urf in fatwas, is the use of ijtihad (individual interpretation or exertion of effort). The use of ijtihad was said to have been ended long before Ibn Abidin was a mufti. However, Ibn Abidin uses great amounts of effort in order to determine the correct answer to a problem in his fatwa, using the knowledge of the common urf and his own reasoning. He seems to have believed that ijtihad was still acceptable to use in certain circumstances. For example, he states that “If Abu Hanifa has a ruling on a matter at hand, then his view is to be followed. If not, then we look for views by Abu Yusuf, then Muhammad al-Shaybani, then Zufar, then Hasan, then some other lesser jurists, but if no one has an answer at all, then it is incumbent on the mufti to look into it by way of deep thinking and ijtihad.” 

The names following Abu Hanifa are those of well-known muftis and scholars before Ibn Abidin’s time. So he believed that ijtihad was acceptable if there was no other option. However, this was not truly his only exception. He also considered acceptable to use his own reason if times had changed and the law required a change. This required change usually meant to him that the times were becoming more and more corrupted and the laws needed to be made stricter.

Ibn Abidin died on 21 Rabi al-thani in the year 1252 AH at the age of 54 years. His funeral prayer was led by his own teacher Saýīd al-Ĥalabī who broke down, weeping and clutching his own beard said: ‘I was treasuring you, for what comes after my old age’. Prayers were held in the Sināniyyah mosque and he was buried – in accordance with his will – near the grave of Shaykh Álāuddin al-Ĥaşkafī, the author of Durr al-Mukhtār and next to the great muĥaddith Şāliĥ al-Jaynīnī in Damascus.

 

 

Radd al Muhtar

Radd al-Muhtar ala al-Dur al-Mukhtar is the most comprehensive and the most authoritative book on Ĥanafī fiqh in the world today, , even more extensive than the Fatawa Hindiyya, a slightly earlier work commissioned by the Mughul emperor, Aurangzeb.

It has been published many times: the Būlāq edition of 1272 AH in five volumes and later in 1276 AH and 1299 AH; the Maymaniyyah edition in 1307 AH; the Istanbul edition of 1307 AH. Once again in 1323 AH, there was a Maymaniyyah edition; and later in 1323 AH, the Bābi al-Ĥalabī edition and Istanbul edition in eight volumes along with the Takmalah, which has been photo-offset a number of times hence.

×
Imam Burhanuddin Marghinani Al-Marghinani رحمة الله عليه

 

Imam Burhan al-Din Al-Farghani Al-Marghinani was a great Islamic scholar of the Hanafi school. He was born at Marghinan in the vicinity of Farghana on Monday 8th Rajab in 511/1135 in Marghinan (in Present Day Uzbekistan)

His full name was Burhan al-Din Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Abi Bakr ibn Abd al-jalil ibn al-Khalil ibn Abi Bakr al-farghani al-Rushdani al-Marghanini.

He is described as the Shayk al-Islam, Imam, Hafidh, Muhaddith,and the leading jurist of his time, the master and possessor of different sciences. His book “Hidaya” became the most famous book in Hanafi Madhab such as he is known as Sahib-e-Hidaya. Al-Dhahabi in Tadhkirat al Huffaz mentioned him as the one filled with knowledge. There was no one like him in his times. 

Al-Marghinani was a prolific writer and wrote numerous books. Some of them are

  1. Bidayatul Mubtadi : The work is chosen from Jami’ al-Saghir and al-Quduri.
  2. Kifayatul Muntaha : long commentary on Bidayatul Mubtadi in 80 volumes. 
  3. Kitab al-Muntaqa </br>
  4. Kitab at-Tajniis Wa al-Mazid </br>
  5. Kitab al-Manasik al Hajj</br>
  6. Nashrul Madhahib</br>
  7. Mukhtarat an-Nawazil</br>
  8. Faraid al-‘Uthmani</br>
  9. Hidaya : medium commentary on the Bidayatul Mubtadi. Started in 573 and finished after 13 years.
  10. Sirat al-Halbiya

 

Teachers:

The most prominent among his teachers were,

  • (i) Al-Nasafi, Imam Najmuddin Abu Hafs `Umar, the author of al-`Aqa’id al-Nasafiyyah fi al-Tauhid;
  • (ii)Sadr al-Shahid, Imam Hisamuddin `Umar bin `Abd al-`Aziz , the commentator of Adab al-Qadi, the most popular book of Imam Khassaf which contains the Islamic Legal and Judicial System.
  • (iii)Al-Bandaniji, Imam Diya’uddin Muhammad ibn al-Husayn (the student of `Ala’uddin al-Samarqandi who was the author of Tuhfatul-Fuqaha’ and teacher and father in law of Abu Bakr al-Kasani (the author of Bada’i` al-Sana’i` fir Tartib al-Shara’i`).

 

Contemporaries:

  • (i) Imam Fakhruddin Qadi Khan, the author of Fatawa Qadi Khan;
  • (ii)Al-Sadr al-Kabir Burhanuddin, the author of Muhit al-Burhani;
  • (iii)Imam Zahiruddin Muhammad Ibn Ahmad al-Bukhari, the author of Fatawa al-Zahiriyyah;
  • (iv)Shaykh Zaynuddin Abu Nasr Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn `Umar al-`Attabi.

 

He died on the 14th of Dhul-Hajj in the year 593/1197, and was buried in Samarqand.

×
Mulla `Ali al-Qari رحمة الله عليه

 

I
mam Ali who is well known as Mulla Ali Al-Qari is one of the great Hanafi masters of hadith and Imams of fiqh, Qur’anic commentary, language, history and tasawwuf. He authored several great commentaries such as al-Mirqat on Mishkat al-masabih in several volumes, a two-volume commentary on Qadi `Iyad’s al-Shifa’, and a two-volume commentary on Ghazali’s abridgment of the Ihya entitled `Ayn al-`ilm wa zayn al-hilm (The spring of knowledge and the adornment of understanding). His book of prophetic invocations, al-Hizb al-a`zam (The supreme daily dhikr) forms the basis of Imam al-Jazuli’s celebrated manual of dhikr, Dala’il al-khayrat, which along with the Qur’an is recited daily by many pious Muslims around the world.

He writes in the foreword to his commentary on Ghazali:

I wrote this commentary on the abridgment of Ihya’ `ulum al-din by the Proof of Islam and the Confirmation of Creatures hoping to receive some of the outpouring of blessings from the words of the most pure knowers of Allah, and to benefit from the gifts that exude from the pages of the Shaykhs and the Saints, so that I may be mentioned in their number and be raised in their throng, even if I fell short in their following and their service, for I rely on my love for them and content myself with my longing for them.

On the obligation to seek purification of the heart he writes:

The greatest of the great (al-akabir) have striven to pray only two rak`at without conversing with their ego about dunya in the midst of their prayer, and they were unable to do this. Therefore there is not any such ambition for us of ever achieving this. Would that one saves only half of his prayer, or only a third, from the whisperings and the passing thoughts turning over in the mind. He is like him who mixes good and bad, like a glass full of vinegar into which water is poured: inevitably vinegar is spilled in proportion to the water poured and the two amounts never coexist. We ask for Allah’s help!

The last chapter of Qari’s commentary on Ghazali, perhaps the most valuable of the entire work, is devoted to Ghazali’s and Qari’s explanations of the verse 

“If you love Allah, follow me, and Allah will love you!” (3:31)
and is reminiscent of al-Harawi’s Kitab sad maydan on the same topic. In it Qari cites al-Hasan al-Basri as saying:

“Whoever (truly) knows his Lord loves Him, and whoever (truly) knows the world does without it.” Qari begins the chapter with a warning that the various spiritual states of love for Allah described by Sufis in their terminology all proceed from the same Qur’anic source and that it is not permitted to deny them unless one denies the source itself: Love and the discipline of the path (al-mahabba wa al-suluk) mean the path of love and longing, and whoever does not scoop his drink from the ocean of gnosticism does not know the reality of love, even if the genus, examples, and terminology are different. Love has no other meaning than the exhortation to obedience, and whoever denies love denies familiarity (uns) and passion (shawq) and taste (dhawq) and effacement (mahu) and clarity (sahu) and extinction (fana‘) and subsistence (baqa‘) and contraction (qabd) and expansion (bast) and all the rest of the necessary characteristics of love and longing, and the rest of the stations of the People of Gnosis.

×
Ala Hazrat Imam Ahmed Raza Al-Qaderi رحمة الله عليه

 

 

I
mam Ahmed Raza Khan was born on Monday, the 10th of Shawaal 1272 A.H. (14th June 1856), in the city of Bareilly India.

The name that was given to him at birth was the beautiful name of “Mohammed.” The name corresponding to that year of his birth was “Al Mukhtaar.” His grandfather, also gave the beautiful name of “Ahmed Raza.” It was by this name that he was famously known. Much later in his life, A’la Hadrat added the title “Abdul Mustafa” to his name signifying his great love and respect for Sayyiduna Rasulullah (Peace be upon him).

Imam Ahmed Raza Khan Al-Qaderi, was the son of Allamah Mawlana Naqi Ali Khan, who was the son of Allamah Mawlana Raza Ali Khan. The great forefathers of A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) migrated from Qandhar (Kabul) during the Mogul rule and settled in Lahore. Later on they settled in Bareilly a famous city of north India.

A’la Hadrat’s grandfather Allamah Mawlana Raza Ali Khan was born in the year 1224 A.H. He was also a great warrior and fought with General Bakht Khan against English invaders in the year 1834. He passed away in the month of Jamaadi-ul-Awwal in the year 1282 A.H. (1866). A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) was at this time only 10 years old.

His father, Hadrat Mawlana Naqi Ali Khan was a great scholar of Islam and jurist, who wrote more than 50 books, Mawlana Naqi Ali Khan passed away in 1297 A.H. (1880) when Ala Hazrat was 24 years old.

A’la Hadrat Imam Ahmad Raza delivered his first lecture at the age of 6 years. It was during the glorious month of Rabi-ul-Awwal. He stood on the Minbar (Pulpit) and delivered a lecture before a very large gathering which also consisted of Ulema. His lecture lasted for approximately 2 hours. A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) spoke on the Wilaadat (Birth) of Sayyiduna Rasulullah .

A’la Hadrat was so gifted and intelligent that there was no need for him to study beyond the fourth Kitaab of his course under the tutorship of any of his teachers. He studied the remaining Kitaabs by himself and used to later ask his teachers to test him.

When he was 8 years old, wrote a Mas’ala concerning Fara’idh (Fards). When his father looked at the answer, he happily remarked, “If only some adult could answer in this manner.”

At the age of 10, when he was studying the Kitaab, “I’lm-us- Thuboot,” under the guidance of his father, he noticed a few objections and answers of his father on the side of the page. A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) studied this book carefully and wrote such a well- explained footnote that even the need for an objection was ruled out. His father came across his research on that objection. He was so delighted that he stood up and held the young A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) to his heart and said, “Ahmad Raza! You do not learn from me, but you teach me.”

 

PROFICIENCY IN OVER FIFTY BRANCHES OF KNOWLEDGE

If we study the life of A’la Hadrat we will discover that HIS PROFICIENCY IN VARIOUS SUBJECTS TOTAL OVER FIFTY FOUR BRANCHES OF KNOWLEDGE. Is it possible today, to find an Islamic scholar or even a non-Muslim professor, scientist, educationist or a Nobel Prize owner who possesses such qualifications? Arab Scholars like Sheikh Ismail bin Khalil and Sheikh Musa Ali Shami (radi Allahu anhuma) commended A’la Hadrat(radi Allahu anhu) as the Revivalist of the 14th Century A.H.:

“IF HE IS CALLED THE REVIVALIST OF THIS CENTURY, IT WILL BE RIGHT AND TRUE.”
 

 

A GREAT JURIST OF HIS TIME

Sayyiduna A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) was regarded as the greatest Jurist of his era. He was totally proficient in the field of Fiqh and received acceptance by the great Ulema of the East and the West. The greatest proof of his position and status in the world of Fiqh can be understood from his answers concerning the Shariat-e-Mustapha (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam),which was compiled into 12 large volumes, comprising of approximately 12 000 pages to form the famous book, “Fatawa Radawiyyah,” which is used in every Darul Ifta (Fatawah Departments) around the world today.

A renowned theologian and a great Saint of Delhi, Hadrat Mawlana Zayd Abul Hassan Faruqi (radi Allahu anhu), who completed his education at the Al Azhar University, Cairo, acknowledged the unrivalled mastery of Imam Ahmed Raza Khan (radi Allahu anhu) over Islamic Jurisprudence and other branches of learning in the following words:

“None can deny the knowledge of Mawlana Ahmed Raza Khan in the field of Fiqh. He was, no doubt, the greatest Faqih (Jurist) of his time.”

When Sheikh Ismail Khalil, the Curator of the Library at Makkatul Mukarramah, read the Fatawas of A’la Hazrat (radi Allahu anhu) he was puffed up with joy and wrote to A’la Hazrat (radi Allahu anhu):

“By Allah, if Abu Hanifa Nu’man (radi Allahu anhu) would have gone through these Fatawa, undoubtedly, it could have been his heart’s delight and granted its writer among his pupils.”

 

 

HIS KNOWLEDGE OF PHILOSOPHY, SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS:

Imam Ahmed Raza Khan (radi Allahu anhu) was a great Scientist and Philosopher. He understood Science and Philosophy better than anyone in his time. He was a master of Ancient and Modern Sciences. He proved through research that various concepts of the modern day science are illogical and against the theories of the Holy Quran and the Ahadith. He wrote many books on Science and Physics.

A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) was also a great Mathematician. He used to solve the most difficult mathematical problems in a short space of time. His authority in the field of Mathematics will leave modern-day Mathematicians wide-mouthed. Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, Logarithms, and other branches of Mathematics which are normally handled with great difficulty even by mathematics students today, was like ordinary addition and subtraction to A’la Hadrat!

A’la Hadrat Imam Ahmad Raza gained proficiency in more that fifty branches of knowledge. With this, A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) wrote many books on various aspects of Islam. A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) was a genius writer. He wrote numerous books and treatises in Arabic, Persian, and Urdu on diversified topics.

In 1887, at the age of 30 years, he had completed 75 books and treatises. In 1909, at the age of 43 years, this number increased up to 500.HOWEVER, IT HAS BEEN ESTIMATED THAT THE NUMBER OF BOOKS WRITTEN BY SAYYIDUNA A’LA HADRAT (RADI ALLAHU ANHU) EXCEED 1 000 ON MORE THAN 50 BRANCHES OF KNOWLEDGE. Apart from these contributions, he had written annotations and commentaries on more than 150 books pertaining to various branches of learning. From the many books that were written by him, a table of 549 has been classified.

The brightly shining sun of Bareilly Shareef, The Mujaddid of the Century, The Imam Abu Hanifa of his time, A’la Hadrat, Imam Ahmad Raza Khan (radi Allahu anhu) left this mundane world on Friday, the 25th of Safar 1340 A.H. (28 October 1921) at 2.38 p.m.. It was the exact time of the Jummah Azaan. The Mazaar Shareef (Blessed Tomb) of Sayyiduna A’la Hadrat (radi Allahu anhu) is situated in the Mohalla Saudagran, Bareilly Shareef in India (U.P.)

×
Sadrush Shariah Allama Amjad Ali Azmi رحمة الله عليه

 

A
llama Muhammad Amjad Ali Azmi was amongst one of the most prominent and illustrious personalities of India. He was the greatest Jurist of his era in the Indian sub-continent. He is known as Sadrush-Shariah in the sub-continent.

He was born in Ghosi, a known town of Azamgarh in India. His father and grandfather both were renowned scholars in Religious theology and expert specialists in Unani medicine. He received his higher education at the Madrassa Hanafiya in Jaunpur.

From Allama Hidayatullah Rampuri. After graduating from Jaunpur he travelled to Madrasatul Hadieth Pileebheet, and learnt there Islamic Juresprudence and Hadieth, and achieved his authority of Hadieth from prominent Shaikh of the time Allama Wasi Ahmed Muhaddithe Surati.

After graduating and acquiring his degree, he was immediately engaged as the Principal of Madrassa Ahl-e-Sunnat which was one of the most reputable Madrassas in Patna, Bihar.  He then journeyed to Lucknow where he studied ‘Ilm-ut-Tibb’ for two years. After completion of this course, he returned home and commenced serving the people by starting a clinic. His clinic began to progress successfully. When Huzoor Muhadith-e-Surati heard that Sadrush Shariah had started practicing and had opened a clinic for this purpose, he became very sad. At this time,  A’la Hazrat Imam Ahmed Raza Khan required the services of a teacher at the Darul-Uloom Manzar-e-Islam. Sadrush Shariah then left his clinic and proceeded to Bareilly. At Bareilly, he first served as a teacher.

When Huzoor Sadrush Shariah intended to visit Bareilly Shareef from Pilibhit, Huzoor Muhadith-e-Surti wrote a letter to A’la Hazrat, Imam Ahmed Raza Khan asking him to inspire him to continue in the field of Ilm-e-Deen. Within a few months, Imam Ahmed Raza Khan arranged for Sadrush Shariah to reside permanently in Bareilly Shareef. He was entrusted with many responsibilities by Imam Ahmed Raza Khan. Important affairs such as, The Educational Affairs of Madrassa Manzar-e-Islam, The management of Anjuman Ahl-e-Sunnat, The management of the printing press, arrangement of manuscripts, proofing of books that were being prepared for publishing, issuing Fatawa.

Due to his potential and his devotionImam Ahmed Raza looked at him with great respect and due to this he had immense trust and faith in him. Hence he appointed him as the Qadi of the entire Indian Sub-Continent.

After approximately fifteen years he journeyed to Ajmer Shareef in 1343/1924 to take up the position as Principal at Darul Uloom Mu’eenia Uthmania. He remained there until 1350 and quenched the thirst of those who came in search of knowledge. He produced there many scholars who later became the great Ulama of the time.

He returned to Bareilly Shareef in 1351 and for 3 years he served as a teacher at the Darul Ifta. In 1354, Nawab Haji Ghulam Muhammad Khan Sherwani, the Governor of Dadon Aligarh invited him to take up the post as principal at Madrassa Haafizia Sa’eedia which he accepted. He remained there for seven years and taught during this time with sincerity and devotion, producing dynamic and capable scholars. He was truly proficient in the art of teaching and instructing.

There came a time when the Aligarh Muslim University intended to initiate a department which would specialise in Eastern education which would

allow students to study right and achieve an M.A. and for this, they were in search of scholars who understood the current day situation and the

manner of instruction in the current day classroom. Amongst those who were appointed to plan this faculty, was Sadrush Shariah 

The Roving Ambassador of Islam Allama Abdul Aleem Siddiqi Meerati presented the contents to a syllabus which he prepared, for correction and setting, to Huzoor Sadrush Shariah (alaihi rahma). Whilst delivering a discourse at the Annual Jalsa of Madrassa Haafizia Sa’eedia Maulana Habibur Rahman Sherwani paid tributes to the Allama Amjadi Ali as a person and as a professional with these words:

‘There are only four or five teachers in the continent that I regard as completely proficient and appointed on merit, and Maulana Amjad Ali is amongst them. The fact that students are becoming Faazils at his hands and acquiring certificates of merit is clear evidence of his proficiency.’

 

It is the blessing of the teaching of Huzoor Sadrush Shariah that those who are his students directly or indirectly can be found throughout the globe today propagating Islam. There is probably not a single Madrassa or Darul Uloom in the Indo-Pak sub-continent that does not have at least one teacher that has not attained his blessings. His works in the field of Fiqh are undoubtedly shining evidence of his services.

Huzoor Sadrush Shariah took Bai’at at the hands of A’la Hazrat Imam Ahmed Raza Khan. He was blessed with the Khilafat and the Wakaalat from Huzoor A’la Hazrat for giving Bai’at in his behalf. It was due to this dedication and his striving sincerity that Imam Ahmed Raza said: ‘Maulana Amjad Ali Sahib is a work machine’ Sadrush Shariah contributed greatly to the initiation and finalisation of the world-renowned translation of the Holy Qur’an by Imam Ahmed Raza, entitled Kanz-ul-Imaan.

His expertise in Fiqh is why Imam Ahmed Raza conferred the title ‘Sadrush Shariah’ to him.

Huzoor Sadrush Shariah initially started writing marginal notes on the voluminous book of Imam Abu Ja’far Tahawi on Hadith, entitled ‘Sharh Ma’ani’ul Athar’ and in a short period of seven months, he completed a comprehensive annotation of more than 450 pages on this masterpiece.

Another distinguished work of Huzoor Sadrush Shariah is his Fatawa Amjadia, which is in four volumes, comprising of several of his Fatawa.

Bahaar-e-Shariat is that universally acclaimed book of Huzoor Sadrush Shariah which can be justifiably called the Encyclopaedia of Hanafi Fiqh. Huzoor Sadrush Shariah wrote 17 parts of the 20 part book. The remaining three volumes were completed by his students. It must be noted that the world renowned book Fatawa-e-Alamgiri also known as Hindiya was compiled by the efforts of more than five hundred outstanding scholars at

that time. Huzoor Sadrush Shariah on the other hand, wrote the famous Bahaar-e-Shariat single handedly. This book has been written in such a beautiful and simple manner that not only can the Ulama make use of it but even the general public is able to derive benefit through it. A’la Hazrat Imam Ahmed Raza Khan personally listened to the first six parts of Bahaar-e-Shariat as Huzoor Sadrush Shariah recited it to him. After listening to the first six parts, Huzoor A’la Hazrat mentioned to Sadrush Shariah that he had his blessings to continue and there was now no need to read it to him anymore. This was the confidence that Imam Ahmed Raza had in the work of Sadrush Shariah. Sadrush Shariah found time to do all this even though he spent most of his time instructing students. The students of Huzoor Sadrush Shariah include some of the greatest Ulama of the time.

Huzoor Sadrush Shariah departed this world to the hereafter on Monday, the 2nd of Zil Qadah 1367 Hijri, coinciding 6th September 1948 at 11pm whilst intending to journey for his second Hajj and Ziyaarat. May Allah ta’aala, grant him a special closeness in the shade of His Mercy. Aameen

×
Allama Mustafa Raza Khan رحمة الله عليه

 

 

A
llama Mustafa Raza Khan, commonly known among the Muslims of the Indian sub-continent as “Mufti-e-Azam Hind” was born in Bareilly (India) in 1892. His father, Moulana Ahmed Raza Khan (1856 – 1921) and grandfather, Moulana Naqi Ali Khan (d. 1880), were recognised as great scholars of Islam in Islamic academic circles all over the world.

Educational Background: He was born into a scholarly atmosphere. Moulana Mustapha Raza Khan completed his religious education under the guidance of his learned father as well as other great Ulema.
He was well versed in more than twenty branches of oriental learning, including Tafseer, Hadith, Fiqh, Sarf, Nahv, Tajweed, Balghat, Tasawwuf, Mantiq, Seerah, Tareekh, Kalam, Aqa’id, Reyazvi, Touqeet, Jafar and Hayat.

He was a Shaikh of the Qadriya order. His own spiritual guide, Shaik Shah Abul Hussain Noori (1839-1906) of Mahrehra Shareef (India) was a great Sufi and spiritual guide. It is estimated that nearly ten million Muslims received spiritual guidance from Huzoor Mufti-e-Azam Hind.

He visited Haramain Shareefain three times. During his two pilgrimages in 1905 and 1945, photographs were not introduced for the Haj journey. But on his last visit in 1971, although visa and passport photographs were introduced, he was given special permission to travel to Saudi Arabia without providing his photograph for passport or visa by the governments of India and Saudi Arabia. This event showed the strict adherence of Huzoor Mufti-e-Azam Hind to the Shariah.

He started issuing Fatawa while he was only a boy of 13 years old. His first Fatawa was on “Raza’ah”. At the age of 13 he became a recognised “Mufti” and it is estimated that he issued more than 50 000 Fatawas during his lifetime. All the contemporary Ulema and Fuqaha respected his opinion on current issues and accepted his Fatawa as the most reliable religious verdict in the sub-continent. Collections of his Fatawa have been published in Urdu in two volumes under the title “Fatawa Mustafawiya”.
He started teaching in Jamia Manzare Islam, Bareilly in 1910. He served in this prominent institution for a period of about 27 years. He was a proficient scholar of Hadith and Fiqh. Several famous Islamic teachers of the sub-continent who were his pupils went on later to teach in the prominent Darul Ulooms of India and Pakistan.

In spite of his round the year journeys all over India, and his deep commitment to his Central Darul Ifta, he wrote many books and commentaries on some of the books of Fatawa and Fiqh. It is estimated that he has left about 40 books on a variety of subjects and important issues. He followed the methodology of his great father in his writings. He was very bold and strong while expressing his views and presenting his ideas.

He offered a dignified and powerful leadership to Muslims throughout his life. He was a man of principle and high morals. He never remained silent on such occasions when the reputation of Islam and Muslims came under threat. He was at the forefront during the movement to restore the Shahid Ganj Mosque at Lahore in 1935 and declared that participation in this movement was Fard for Muslims. Similarly in 1976 when the programme of compulsory sterilization (Vasectomy) was forced upon Muslims along with other Indian communities, by the Central Government of India, Mufti-e-Azam Hind was the only Muslim leader to oppose the campaign vigorously and publicly. He issued his Fatawa against the government and arranged its distribution all over India.

He passed away on the eve of the 14th of Muharram 1402 A.H. in Bareilly (India). It was estimated that over two and a half million Muslims from all over the world attended his funeral prayer. He is buried in Bareilly beside his father, A’la Hazrat, Imam Ahmed Raza Khan.

×
Mufti Muhammad Waqaruddin رحمة الله عليه

H
e was born on 14th of Safarul Muzaffar 1333 Ah/ 15 January 1915 AC in Pilibheet India, he received his education in Fiqh and Hadeith from Sadrush Sharia. He had the honor to take the oath of allegiance (the Bayat) to Hujjatul Islam Hazrat Hamid Raza Kahn, and reiceived Khilafat from Mufti Azam Hind Allama Musrafa Raza Khan. Allama Sardar Ahmad Muhaddithe Azam Pakistan is among his teachers whereas Allama Abdul Mustafa Al-Azhari was among his contemporaries. He is known as Mufti Azam Pakistan.

  1. Mufti Muhammad Waqqaruddin studied from four great Scholars in Manzare Islam Bareily Shareef which include:
    1. Sadrush e Shariah Maulana Amjad ali aazmi
  2. Mohaddis e Aazam Pakistan Maulana Sardar Ahmad Qadiri
    After some times, Sadrush e Shariah left Bareily Shareef and headed towards a village in Zilla Ali Garh “Dadoon”. His Eminence Mufti Sahib also left for a while to continue with the further education. For three years they stayed in the company of Huzoor Sadrush e Shariah and completed the religious education and then started a Dowra e Hadees. In the Dowara e hadees other students included were Allama Abdul Mustafa azhari, Maulana Mustafa Ali and Maulana Khaleel.

The education of Hadees was completes in 1938 ac, also this was the year in which the graduation cerromney took place. And was awarded with the Certificate. Hazrat Sadrush e Shariah Hakeem Maulana Amjad Ali did the Dastaarbandi.

His Eminence Mufti Sahib started teaching at the same Daruloom.

In those days Mohaddis e Aazam Pakistan Maulana Sardar Ahmad and Sheikhul Hadees Maulana Abdul Mustafa al-Azhari were also fulfiling in with the duties of teaching there. They thought for about ten years from 1938 ac til 1947 ac. Many people completed their education at their hands.

When Pakistan was declared on the 14th August 1947 AC, they migrated towards Bengal (i.e. eastern Pakistan) and started teaching at many Madrasas. But the situation in the eastern Pakistan was getting worse so therefore they left east Pakistan in 23rd March 1971 AC towards western Pakistan and started whilst teaching at Daruloom Amjjadiya Karachi he was made a principle, and became the head of Darul Ifta. Many people used ask Masail in and outside the country. His fatwas were made in collection and this is called Waqqarul Fatawa.

His scholastic work of judicial acumen of Fiqh namely “Waqar ul Farawa” is a treasure and is itself a tribute to his work. He trained and prepared a class of glorious scholars.

After the demise of Allama Abdul Mustafa al-Azhari  he became the next Sheikul Hadees. He passed away on Saturday the 20th of Rabi ul Awwal in 1413 AH/19 September 1993. His holy shrine is situated besides Allama Abdul Mustafa al-Azhari in Dar ul Uloom Amjadiya Karachi Pakistan.

×
Mufti Jalaluddin Amjadi رحمة الله عليه

M
ufti Jalaluddin Ahmad Amjadi is a well-known jurist of the last century in India, and known as Faqeeh-e-Millat. He was born 1352 AH /1933 AC in Ujha ganj Basti (India)He studied from Allama Arshadul Qadri. His forefathers were from Rajput family, one of them Murad Singh converted to Islam and named as Murad Ali. His father Jan Muhammad was a pious man, and was appointed as Imam to lead five times prayers and Friday prayer as well without any pay.

Mufti Jalaluddin memorized Holy Quran at the age of ten, and received his basic education in his own area, then after India gor freedom from Birtish Empire he journeyed to Nagpur, where he began working (to earn money for supporting his father) in the day time and learning religious education from Allama Arshadul Qadri after sunset till midnight. This continued till he completed his Islamic education and was honored with certificate of completion on 24th Sha’ban 1371 AH / 19th May 1952 AC on the hand of Allama Arshadul Qadri. After that he started teaching in Madrasa Qadria Rizvia in Basti (India), thereafter he joined on 10th July 1956 AC Dar-Al-Uloom Faiz-Ar-Rasool Baraoon Shareef the famous institute of north India per the appointment by Shuaibul Auliya Hazrat Muhammad Yar Ali. He built his teaching career there such as he became popular as jurist and well-practicing scholar.

Laten on he built a institute for Fatawa specialization namely “Darul Uloom Amjadia Arshadul Uloom. And he moved to his own institute to stablish it. He produced many scholars and jurist from both institutions.

He wrote his first Fatwa when he was 24, and continued, and recognized as a great jurist and Mufti of the India. The collection of his Fatawa has been published having title of “Fatawa Faizul Rasool” in two volumes and became source of knowledge for students and scholars both. Another collection of his Fatawa has been published as “Fatawa Faqeeh-e-Millat also in two volumes. He wrote more than a dozen of books including:

  • Anwar-al-Hadith
  • Ajaeb-Al-Fiqh
  • Khutbaat-E-Muharram
  • Buzurgon ke Aqeede
  • Anwar-e-Shariat

He received oath (Bayat) on the hand of Hazrat Sadrusharia, and honored the Khilafat by Ahsanul Ulama from Marahra Shareef (India)

He passed away on 4 Jumada Al-Ukhra 1422 AH/ 23/08/2001 and buried in Ojhaganj Basti beside Darul Olum Amjadia Arshadul Uloom. (India)

×